Chloe Garcia Ponce, a curandera (Mexican Healer) and herbalist, whose healing works are based on the shamanic teachings of the Mayan Elders and her Cherokee Grandmother, she sits for a portrait in her Brooklyn home on Nov. 14, 2014 in New York. Ponce says the “turtle is my medicine I embody her wisdom when I am doing my healing work”.

Chloe Garcia Ponce, a curandera (Mexican Healer) and herbalist, whose healing works are based on the shamanic teachings of the Mayan Elders and her Cherokee Grandmother, she sits for a portrait in her Brooklyn home on Nov. 14, 2014 in New York. Ponce says the “turtle is my medicine I embody her wisdom when I am doing my healing work”.

   
  
 
  
    
  
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  Chloe Garcia Ponce’s altar holds the four elements; fire, water, air and earth… Every object symbolizes her medicine.

Chloe Garcia Ponce’s altar holds the four elements; fire, water, air and earth… Every object symbolizes her medicine.

   
  
 
  
    
  
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  Shelley Poovey, an Advanced Certified BodyTalk Practitioner, holds a neutral pendulum in her Harlem home on Jan 17, 2015 in New York.  It is used by tapping into inner intuition using your own subtle psychical reactions, bypassing the "should" and "ought to's" of your mind.

Shelley Poovey, an Advanced Certified BodyTalk Practitioner, holds a neutral pendulum in her Harlem home on Jan 17, 2015 in New York.  It is used by tapping into inner intuition using your own subtle psychical reactions, bypassing the "should" and "ought to's" of your mind.

 Dee Savoy, intuitive coach healer and womb priestess, plays her drum named “Wild Child” while posing for a portrait at her Bronx office on Jan. 23, 2015 in New York.  As a coach she helps her clients by tapping into their own intuition and guidance they receive from their helper spirits to awaken their true Goddess nature.

Dee Savoy, intuitive coach healer and womb priestess, plays her drum named “Wild Child” while posing for a portrait at her Bronx office on Jan. 23, 2015 in New York.

As a coach she helps her clients by tapping into their own intuition and guidance they receive from their helper spirits to awaken their true Goddess nature.

   
  
 
  
    
  
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  Andréa Takacs-Carvalho, Wellness Counselor and Spiritual Healer, burns Palo Santo on March 13, 2015 in New York, New York. Palo Santo is a natural wood used for centuries by the Incas and indigenous people of the Andes as a spiritual remedy for purifying and cleansing, as well as to get rid of evil spirits and misfortune. It is common to smudge people and places to clean the area before some meditation or sessions.

Andréa Takacs-Carvalho, Wellness Counselor and Spiritual Healer, burns Palo Santo on March 13, 2015 in New York, New York. Palo Santo is a natural wood used for centuries by the Incas and indigenous people of the Andes as a spiritual remedy for purifying and cleansing, as well as to get rid of evil spirits and misfortune. It is common to smudge people and places to clean the area before some meditation or sessions.

   
  
 
  
    
  
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  Jocelyn James, intuitive Reiki healer, performs Reiki on a patient in her mid-town offices on Feb. 3, 2015. Reiki is a spiritual practice which Japanese Buddhist Mikao Usui developed in 1922.

Jocelyn James, intuitive Reiki healer, performs Reiki on a patient in her mid-town offices on Feb. 3, 2015. Reiki is a spiritual practice which Japanese Buddhist Mikao Usui developed in 1922.

 White Sage, also called a Smudge Stick, is used to ward off evil spirits and negative energies. It’s also used in ceremonies to seek blessings of health, prosperity and protection.

White Sage, also called a Smudge Stick, is used to ward off evil spirits and negative energies. It’s also used in ceremonies to seek blessings of health, prosperity and protection.

 Regina Georges, a clinical hypnotist and natural medium, demonstrates hypnotism techniques on her sister Ashley Pernice in her Rochelle Park, NJ office on Nov. 15 2014. Georges uses her spiritual abilities, in conjunction with hypnosis, to help clients free themselves from unwanted issues such as weight, anxiety and phobias; guiding them through a past life experience to find the root cause of the issue.

Regina Georges, a clinical hypnotist and natural medium, demonstrates hypnotism techniques on her sister Ashley Pernice in her Rochelle Park, NJ office on Nov. 15 2014. Georges uses her spiritual abilities, in conjunction with hypnosis, to help clients free themselves from unwanted issues such as weight, anxiety and phobias; guiding them through a past life experience to find the root cause of the issue.

 Albert Maldonado, Shaman teacher of sixteen years at The Sacred Stone, poses for a portrait on Feb. 9, 2015 in Babylon, New York in the lodge he built behind his home and shop. 

Albert Maldonado, Shaman teacher of sixteen years at The Sacred Stone, poses for a portrait on Feb. 9, 2015 in Babylon, New York in the lodge he built behind his home and shop. 

 Barbara Dominick, energy and sound healing practitioner, says she doesn’t consider what she does to be work; rather it is service in love after meditating on Feb 12, 2015 in her Bronx home. Some people say the mole over her eye holds her psychic gifts.

Barbara Dominick, energy and sound healing practitioner, says she doesn’t consider what she does to be work; rather it is service in love after meditating on Feb 12, 2015 in her Bronx home. Some people say the mole over her eye holds her psychic gifts.

 Bill Bradley, psychic and clairvoyant, poses for a portrait outside his Lake Hopatcong home on Dec. 7, 2014. Bradley has the ability to tap into energy fields and extract negative blocks from the past that hold you back and keep you from recognizing your full potential.

Bill Bradley, psychic and clairvoyant, poses for a portrait outside his Lake Hopatcong home on Dec. 7, 2014. Bradley has the ability to tap into energy fields and extract negative blocks from the past that hold you back and keep you from recognizing your full potential.

 Julie Addario, intuitive healer and channel, poses for a portrait in her Brooklyn home on Nov. 24, 2014 in New York. Addario integrates quartz crystals into her healing sessions as a tool to amplify energies and provide further clarity to the chakra fields the crystals lie on.

Julie Addario, intuitive healer and channel, poses for a portrait in her Brooklyn home on Nov. 24, 2014 in New York. Addario integrates quartz crystals into her healing sessions as a tool to amplify energies and provide further clarity to the chakra fields the crystals lie on.

 Juan Pacach Ramirez, a Mayan Traumatologist (Healer of Bones), poses for a portrait at his home altar in Santiago Atitlán, Guatemala on May 29, 2015.  I dedicate myself to tending to people. It is possible that Mayan medicine has more power, because modern medicine uses chemicals, which does sometimes cure sicknesses, but it sometimes also creates others, such as secondary effects, says Ramirez.

Juan Pacach Ramirez, a Mayan Traumatologist (Healer of Bones), poses for a portrait at his home altar in Santiago Atitlán, Guatemala on May 29, 2015.

I dedicate myself to tending to people. It is possible that Mayan medicine has more power, because modern medicine uses chemicals, which does sometimes cure sicknesses, but it sometimes also creates others, such as secondary effects, says Ramirez.

 Women cleanse each other before Lauren Rees Salm performs a Temazcal on Monday, March 23, 2015 in Tulum, Mexico.

Women cleanse each other before Lauren Rees Salm performs a Temazcal on Monday, March 23, 2015 in Tulum, Mexico.

 Miren Ascua Popelka reaches for a dream catcher hanging over her bed on Tuesday, March 24, 2015, in Tulum Mexico. Popelka was pursuing a doctoral career when she discovered healing, which completely changed her lifestyle.

Miren Ascua Popelka reaches for a dream catcher hanging over her bed on Tuesday, March 24, 2015, in Tulum Mexico. Popelka was pursuing a doctoral career when she discovered healing, which completely changed her lifestyle.

 Volcanic stones, known as “abuelas” or “grandmothers” sit in the grass before getting heated for a Temazcal ceremony on Monday, March 23, 2015 in Tulum Mexico. Temazcals are more commonly known as “sweat lodges” in the Western world.

Volcanic stones, known as “abuelas” or “grandmothers” sit in the grass before getting heated for a Temazcal ceremony on Monday, March 23, 2015 in Tulum Mexico. Temazcals are more commonly known as “sweat lodges” in the Western world.

   
  
 
  
    
  
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   Lauren Rees Salm poses for a portrait in her Tulum home on Thursday, March 26, 2015. Salm says, “Working with herbs, energy and art  has  always been what’s closest to my heart but I never thought that was a viable career option so I pushed it aside until now.”

Lauren Rees Salm poses for a portrait in her Tulum home on Thursday, March 26, 2015. Salm says, “Working with herbs, energy and art has always been what’s closest to my heart but I never thought that was a viable career option so I pushed it aside until now.”

 Susana Guadalupe Tapia performs a healing on Chloe at hotel Casa Violeta in Tulum Mexico on Tuesday, March 24, 2015. Tapia, an Ecuadorian healer, assists women in the “recovery of sacred memory as stored in our ‘first heart,’ the womb.”

Susana Guadalupe Tapia performs a healing on Chloe at hotel Casa Violeta in Tulum Mexico on Tuesday, March 24, 2015. Tapia, an Ecuadorian healer, assists women in the “recovery of sacred memory as stored in our ‘first heart,’ the womb.”

 Katarina Prochazkova plays her drum in the mangroves behind her home in Tulum, Mexico on Saturday, March 28, 2015. Prochazkova has chosen not to practice healing while pregnant because “creating life is the most sacred time in the universe” and the baby could soak up the negative energy if not careful.

Katarina Prochazkova plays her drum in the mangroves behind her home in Tulum, Mexico on Saturday, March 28, 2015. Prochazkova has chosen not to practice healing while pregnant because “creating life is the most sacred time in the universe” and the baby could soak up the negative energy if not careful.

 Lauren Rees Salm and Chloe Garcia Ponce lean against each other during a Spring Equinox Ceremony on Friday, March 20, 2015, in Tulum, Mexico.

Lauren Rees Salm and Chloe Garcia Ponce lean against each other during a Spring Equinox Ceremony on Friday, March 20, 2015, in Tulum, Mexico.

   
  
 
  
    
  
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    Lauren Rees Salm closes her eyes while Chloe Garcia Ponce performs a healing session in Tulum, Mexico on Thursday, March 26, 2015. Plants are used to remove negative energy from the body, every plant has it’s own power, protection and healing properties. Ponce uses plants while praying over the body asking for allies to cleanse, heal and protect the body, mind and spirit.    

Lauren Rees Salm closes her eyes while Chloe Garcia Ponce performs a healing session in Tulum, Mexico on Thursday, March 26, 2015. Plants are used to remove negative energy from the body, every plant has it’s own power, protection and healing properties. Ponce uses plants while praying over the body asking for allies to cleanse, heal and protect the body, mind and spirit.

 

   
  
 
  
    
  
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  Participants begin dancing together inside the Casa Madre Aburrá after drinking Chicha made by Grandmother Matilde at Medellin Botanical Gardens on July 24, 2015 in Medellin, Colombia.  Chicha is used for ritual purposes and consumed it in vast quantities during religious festivals. It has become increasingly rare and the person who makes chicha is greatly respected. 

Participants begin dancing together inside the Casa Madre Aburrá after drinking Chicha made by Grandmother Matilde at Medellin Botanical Gardens on July 24, 2015 in Medellin, Colombia.

Chicha is used for ritual purposes and consumed it in vast quantities during religious festivals. It has become increasingly rare and the person who makes chicha is greatly respected. 

   
  
 
  
    
  
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    Juan Pacach Ramirez works on a patient during a free clinic held by Maya Traditions Foundation in San Juan La Laguna, Guatemala on May 28, 2015.  Maya Traditions Foundation also works in the area of community health, partnering with a local association of Maya healers from the Lake Atitlán region of Guatemala to preserve and promote traditional knowledge and the use of medicinal plants for preventative and curative health care. Working in local communities, the association holds clinics and workshops to restore respect for these traditional practices, improve health outcomes, and promote Maya culture as a means of sustainable health care and economic development for these communities. 

Juan Pacach Ramirez works on a patient during a free clinic held by Maya Traditions Foundation in San Juan La Laguna, Guatemala on May 28, 2015.

Maya Traditions Foundation also works in the area of community health, partnering with a local association of Maya healers from the Lake Atitlán region of Guatemala to preserve and promote traditional knowledge and the use of medicinal plants for preventative and curative health care. Working in local communities, the association holds clinics and workshops to restore respect for these traditional practices, improve health outcomes, and promote Maya culture as a means of sustainable health care and economic development for these communities.